At Budokan Live In Japan, February, 1978

4 out of 5

$15.98

SKU: B0000025GP Category:

Description

As he’d recently done on Street Legal , Dylan employed a bevy of musicians and backup singers for this 1978 show in Japan. Check out these one-of-a-kind arrangements of Love Minus Zero/No Limit; I Want You; All Along the Watchtower; Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door; Blowin’ in the Wind; Don’t Think…

Reviews

  1. Andrew K

    Dylan’s enigmatic. Folk hero, hooray. He went electric, and people cried. He got religion, and people freaked. He got other religion, and everyone panicked. He got married. He got divorced. He got drunk. He got sober. He got more drunk. He went country. The thing about Bob Dylan is that either he is actually utterly gonzo and has no choice but to follow his muse in spite of himself, or he is completely pulling our leg almost all the time, possibly in on the joke, and possibly not. My vote is a little of all of the above. He is aware of his own inertia but somewhat powerless to stop it…you tell him left, he’s either going hard left or harder right. People complain about his more recent tour versions of his tunes…I saw him in Bklyn last fall and loved it, garbled jumbles and moody rambles and Knopfler and all. But the truth is people complain about Bob no matter what. At Budokan represents an immensely listenable, frequently fun, show tunes style romp through most of Dyan’s classics. Then…it was a sell out, a disaster. But these days, when everyone from Santana to Motley Crue do Vegas “residencies” it’s easier to enjoy the record on its own terms, and on those terms, it’s sweet. Why? Upbeat riffs, chick singers and flutes can be fun. Bob actually singing. Nice orchestration. A groove but not an attitude. If you ONLY like acoustic Dylan, ONLY like protest Dylan, ONLY like drunk Dylan, etc, skip it. Wrongly maligned and highly listenable.

  2. P. Nunez

    Dylan’s enigmatic. Folk hero, hooray. He went electric, and people cried. He got religion, and people freaked. He got other religion, and everyone panicked. He got married. He got divorced. He got drunk. He got sober. He got more drunk. He went country. The thing about Bob Dylan is that either he is actually utterly gonzo and has no choice but to follow his muse in spite of himself, or he is completely pulling our leg almost all the time, possibly in on the joke, and possibly not. My vote is a little of all of the above. He is aware of his own inertia but somewhat powerless to stop it…you tell him left, he’s either going hard left or harder right. People complain about his more recent tour versions of his tunes…I saw him in Bklyn last fall and loved it, garbled jumbles and moody rambles and Knopfler and all. But the truth is people complain about Bob no matter what. At Budokan represents an immensely listenable, frequently fun, show tunes style romp through most of Dyan’s classics. Then…it was a sell out, a disaster. But these days, when everyone from Santana to Motley Crue do Vegas “residencies” it’s easier to enjoy the record on its own terms, and on those terms, it’s sweet. Why? Upbeat riffs, chick singers and flutes can be fun. Bob actually singing. Nice orchestration. A groove but not an attitude. If you ONLY like acoustic Dylan, ONLY like protest Dylan, ONLY like drunk Dylan, etc, skip it. Wrongly maligned and highly listenable.

  3. B. Aday

    I’ve been a fan of Dylan’s since the late 70s, which was great cause not only did I get to go forward listening to his new releases but I got to go back and listen to and love all his early works. I LOVE Dylan’s words, delivery, music and signature voice. I first purchased At Budokan when it came out as an LP and loved it…now that the record is worn, I’m buying the CD. I can’t say that I always like LIVE recordings…sometimes the songs are changed so much during the live performances that they are barely even similar to the studio recordings. Well, in this instance the changes are refreshing and a pleasure to listen to. This CD is a collection of some of Bob’s earlier songs performed live with a couple different instruments (sax and flute ) than found in the original recordings. I personally, like the light soulful changes. Other recordings of Ballad of a Thin Man and Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right, particularly versions off “Before The Flood”, are delivered in a softer tone. The tough guitar riffs of Robbie Robertson are replaced with an almost island swaying flavor, but somehow it still works. Dylan manages to take his classic I Shall Be Released and make it new with a beautiful sax, female back up singers and of course his charismatic delivery of the words.I never ever thought I could love any version but the original studio cut of Simple Twist of Fate, yet this live version is absolutely fantastic…the man tells a story his voice soft sexy and compelling. Another favorite, I Want You, redone so well….just wish it was longer. At Budokan is another of my many favorite CDs- LOVE DYLAN!

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