Bob Dylan Radio Radio 5

5 out of 5

$163.00

SKU: B0050BSOZC Category:

Description

Bob Dylan Radio Radio 5

Reviews

  1. Stuart Jefferson

    Four discs-73,73,71,73 minutes each approximately. The sound overall is good to pretty good, depending on the sources used. Like the other volumes in this series, the discs are snapped in, inside a tri-fold book style holder. Song titles, artist, year, and song length are listed on the back. The cover photograph is of a very young Bob Dylan, and is one of the better shots of Dylan in this series. Inside is a page’s worth of b&w photos of a number of artists in this volume-but is similar to previous photos from earlier volumes. The booklet (glued inside the holder) has 5 1/2 pages of information on several of the featured artists,seemingly picked at random. As with other volumes, a good proof-reading would have been nice-an example is the miss-spelling of the Louvin Brothers’ “Satan Is Real”, not “Satin Is Real”. As I’ve said before, more complete information on all the artists would be very valuable, and is one of the things that keeps this set (and the others) from earning more than 4 “stars”. The discs themselves have a nice sepia tone photo of an old Electro-Voice microphone, a nice touch.This volume (the fifth and supposedly final volume in this series) is largely made up of songs from the first Theme Time Radio Hour Series from 2006-2007. The categories are familiar to anyone who has heard either the original broadcasts or other releases from the broadcasts. As usual there’s no Dylan to be found anywhere in this volume. It would have been nice to have heard Dylan’s patter concerning these tracks, but (at least for me) the music is the most important thing here.Categories include-weather, mothers, baseball, cars, rich man poor man, eyes, the Bible, school, water, guns, sleep, countdown, women’s names, luck, shoes, trains, fools, spring cleaning, musical instruments (with Dinah Washington singing “Big Long Slidin’ Thing”-hmmm) and so on. Artists include Dean Martin, J.B. Lenoir, Bobby Darin, Lefty Frizzell, Woody Guthrie, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Rev. Gary Davis, Kitty Wells, Little Willie John, Eddie Boyd, B.B. King, Hank Williams, Jr., The Coasters, Eric Dolphy, Nat King Cole, Frankie Lane, Papa Lightfoot, Furry Lewis, and many other well known artists. But the inclusion of lesser known people, like Tommy Duncan, Jimmy Caroll, Mighty Sparrow, Ronnie & The Delinquents, Lattie Moore, Sleepy LaBeef, and a number of others, give this set a good balance and depth. Styles range from blues, jazz, r&b, gospel, country, folk, rockabilly, straight vocalists, and so on. Many tracks were recorded in the 1950’s, with some earlier (1920’s, 1940’s, etc.), to some from 1960.As with the other volumes in this series, anyone with a taste for obscure songs mixed in with more familiar tunes will like this set. This is the type of music from an America long since past, when music served a different purpose than today’s cookie-cutter music. There’s an honest, straightforward feel to much if this music. As with all collections of this type, you’ll have your favorites, while other tracks might not impress. But that’s okay, because what’s here is another good example of “American” music, when America was a far different place than today. For anyone with “big” ears, there’s much to enjoy here. If you’re new to this series, and have ever wondered what people were listening to many decades ago, this (and the other volumes) will fill the bill nicely. The best of this music deserves to be heard, and not relegated to the forgotten heap of “old funny music” from long ago. This entire series is an inexpensive way to tap into the “old” America, and go back in time-and it’s time well spent.

  2. Little Ruf

    Four discs-73,73,71,73 minutes each approximately. The sound overall is good to pretty good, depending on the sources used. Like the other volumes in this series, the discs are snapped in, inside a tri-fold book style holder. Song titles, artist, year, and song length are listed on the back. The cover photograph is of a very young Bob Dylan, and is one of the better shots of Dylan in this series. Inside is a page’s worth of b&w photos of a number of artists in this volume-but is similar to previous photos from earlier volumes. The booklet (glued inside the holder) has 5 1/2 pages of information on several of the featured artists,seemingly picked at random. As with other volumes, a good proof-reading would have been nice-an example is the miss-spelling of the Louvin Brothers’ “Satan Is Real”, not “Satin Is Real”. As I’ve said before, more complete information on all the artists would be very valuable, and is one of the things that keeps this set (and the others) from earning more than 4 “stars”. The discs themselves have a nice sepia tone photo of an old Electro-Voice microphone, a nice touch.This volume (the fifth and supposedly final volume in this series) is largely made up of songs from the first Theme Time Radio Hour Series from 2006-2007. The categories are familiar to anyone who has heard either the original broadcasts or other releases from the broadcasts. As usual there’s no Dylan to be found anywhere in this volume. It would have been nice to have heard Dylan’s patter concerning these tracks, but (at least for me) the music is the most important thing here.Categories include-weather, mothers, baseball, cars, rich man poor man, eyes, the Bible, school, water, guns, sleep, countdown, women’s names, luck, shoes, trains, fools, spring cleaning, musical instruments (with Dinah Washington singing “Big Long Slidin’ Thing”-hmmm) and so on. Artists include Dean Martin, J.B. Lenoir, Bobby Darin, Lefty Frizzell, Woody Guthrie, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Rev. Gary Davis, Kitty Wells, Little Willie John, Eddie Boyd, B.B. King, Hank Williams, Jr., The Coasters, Eric Dolphy, Nat King Cole, Frankie Lane, Papa Lightfoot, Furry Lewis, and many other well known artists. But the inclusion of lesser known people, like Tommy Duncan, Jimmy Caroll, Mighty Sparrow, Ronnie & The Delinquents, Lattie Moore, Sleepy LaBeef, and a number of others, give this set a good balance and depth. Styles range from blues, jazz, r&b, gospel, country, folk, rockabilly, straight vocalists, and so on. Many tracks were recorded in the 1950’s, with some earlier (1920’s, 1940’s, etc.), to some from 1960.As with the other volumes in this series, anyone with a taste for obscure songs mixed in with more familiar tunes will like this set. This is the type of music from an America long since past, when music served a different purpose than today’s cookie-cutter music. There’s an honest, straightforward feel to much if this music. As with all collections of this type, you’ll have your favorites, while other tracks might not impress. But that’s okay, because what’s here is another good example of “American” music, when America was a far different place than today. For anyone with “big” ears, there’s much to enjoy here. If you’re new to this series, and have ever wondered what people were listening to many decades ago, this (and the other volumes) will fill the bill nicely. The best of this music deserves to be heard, and not relegated to the forgotten heap of “old funny music” from long ago. This entire series is an inexpensive way to tap into the “old” America, and go back in time-and it’s time well spent.

  3. Mr. Fate

    Anything Bob Dylan puts his name is usually gold. This is no exception. Quite educational.

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