Inside Bob Dylan’s Jesus Years: Busy Being Born… Again!

3 out of 5

$7.99

SKU: B001EN46NO Category:

Description

Once called “Dylan’s God Awful Gospel” by his most loyal fans, Bob Dylan’s “Jesus Years” are today regarded as among the best of his career. Finally, here is an insiders view into Bob Dylan’s “Born Again” transformation, and its affect on his life and music. In late 1978, Bob Dylan fell into the…

Reviews

  1. Martin B. Cramer

    If people claim that their lives are the same from the cradle to the grave they are being less than truthful. If we put our entertainers up on pedestals and hold them to our own standards without seeing them as living, growing, changing people we do ourselves and them a disservice. Bob Dylan is nothing if not one who goes his own way. He sees the world from his point of view that just happens to be what many other people would like to see. He sees in a light that is really quite different and very personal. The songs he writes come from a place that only he knows and understands.When he declared his belief in Jesus as his Lord and Savior it was a very personal decision that was expressed in his art and music. This time in his life was very mysterious to his hardcore fans who lived through a time of sex, drugs, and rock & roll. The problem is that the Christianity that most people know is expressed in very severe terms; just check out the televangelists of the health and wealth gospel. This presentation goes to the heart of what Dylan lived at the time both in his new found faith and his art. The interviews come from both sides of the debate: his Christian teachers and the musicians who worked with him. One of the most interesting segments is the interview with Jerry Wexler, the producer of “Slow Train Coming.” Pay attention to this.To get a balanced view of this time in Bob’s life buy this. It will be well worth the time spent watching and the money spent acquiring it.Marty Cramer

  2. B. Hepp

    Bob Dylan’s so-called ‘Jesus years’ have been cruelly maligned by fans and onlookers alike, perceiving his conversion to Christianity as his second betrayal. His move from folk to rock ‘n roll, embracing the electric guitar, and all the potential that such a weapon of Dylan’s would have, had the same impact as his salvation, both events being decried by his audience.The records that belonged to this period include, Slow Train Coming, the awesome, spirited and uplifting Saved, as well as part of the gospel tinged Shot Of Love. This documentary covers this period by seeking commentary from pastors, musicians, record producers, journalists, a little bit of footage from Dylan’s live performances and one interview.Inside Bob Dylan’s Jesus Years: Busy Being Born Again, is a curious documenatry, highlighting something that has been all but ignored by many music fans, inspite of the reverence of his adoring fan base. It does give the impression it was made on a small budget, but the interviews are warm and wonderful and all the right questions are asked. Definitely worth a look.

  3. ninjaflinky

    If people claim that their lives are the same from the cradle to the grave they are being less than truthful. If we put our entertainers up on pedestals and hold them to our own standards without seeing them as living, growing, changing people we do ourselves and them a disservice. Bob Dylan is nothing if not one who goes his own way. He sees the world from his point of view that just happens to be what many other people would like to see. He sees in a light that is really quite different and very personal. The songs he writes come from a place that only he knows and understands.When he declared his belief in Jesus as his Lord and Savior it was a very personal decision that was expressed in his art and music. This time in his life was very mysterious to his hardcore fans who lived through a time of sex, drugs, and rock & roll. The problem is that the Christianity that most people know is expressed in very severe terms; just check out the televangelists of the health and wealth gospel. This presentation goes to the heart of what Dylan lived at the time both in his new found faith and his art. The interviews come from both sides of the debate: his Christian teachers and the musicians who worked with him. One of the most interesting segments is the interview with Jerry Wexler, the producer of “Slow Train Coming.” Pay attention to this.To get a balanced view of this time in Bob’s life buy this. It will be well worth the time spent watching and the money spent acquiring it.Marty Cramer

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