More Blood, More Tracks: The Bootleg Series Vol. 14

4 out of 5

$101.79

SKU: B07H5VTTDD Category:

Description

Strictly limited Deluxe 6 CD Set Includes every surviving take from Blood On The Tracks, including the complete New York sessions. Features alternate versions of Tangled Up In Blue , Simple Twist Of Fate and Shelter From The Storm Over 70 previously unreleased recordings Bonus hardcover book…

Reviews

  1. Stuart Jefferson

    “To me it felt almost too intimate; too close to the bone. Literally blood on every track.””Nobody convinces Bob to do anything Bob doesn’t want to do.””Fierce, passionate, and intense. Dylan is still almost as different as one could imagine from the artist he had been just three months prior in New York.”This is a box set many people (including me) have waited for, for quite some time. This latest trawl through Dylan’s vaults wasn’t released simply to assuage fan’s desires for more music from the “Blood On The Tracks” sessions–but to ensure that copyright control didn’t slip away from Columbia/Sony Records. But the legal reasons are well beside the point. The end results for Bob-o-philes and/or fans of that original album is that we now get to hear the available tracks recorded over those six days in ’74. In one way this set can be heard as a multi-disc extension of the original album’s songs–not just Dylan working through the lyrics and the music to the final takes.Now issued in chronological order, and without the slight echo added to the original album tracks and at the correct pitch for the first time, this music takes us down avenues explored by Dylan as he tries various combinations of musicians and lyrics in search of hearing on tape what he heard in his head. And with the remixed sound (even on the officially released album tracks) these performances have a closeness, an immediacy, a “human-ness” that brings another dimension to these songs. The original album tracks, now remixed, have a slightly different feel to them, while the unheard tracks each bring something worthwhile to fan’s ears. The majority of these tracks are taken from the multi-track master tapes, but there are a few tracks that come from mono 1/4″ rough mixes, which have lower fidelity.And while there’s multiple takes of a number of songs, the seeming repetition doesn’t make for tedious listening–far from it. There’s a certain something here that’s captivating–listening to Dylan as he changes his mind (and a few lyrics) to something ever closer to what he wanted. Picking out high points is pretty useless. Each take here has something to recommend it–these album sessions are that important. There’s a single disc available that picks out a few alternate takes which only hints at this whole process Dylan went through. But diving deep into the music from these sessions (a few tracks have been previously released on the “Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3”, “Biograph”, and “Blood On The Tracks” test pressings) you really begin to understand what was in Dylan’s mind during this period–an album about his personal problems–or an album influenced by Chekov’s short stories–who knows for sure? From solo sessions to duos. trios and full bands, this multi-disc set is the best way to hear all the tracks surrounding one of Dylan’s finest albums.Disc One is Dylan solo–vocal, acoustic guitar, harmonica–with some intimate performances that are quite nice to finally hear together. Disc Two has Dylan playing with the Deliverance band–but the band not giving enough impact to Dylan’s songs–which nonetheless are a good insight into Dylan’s struggles recording these tunes. Also here are several takes of “Idiot Wind” with only a bassist accompanying Dylan which have a power of their own, and many takes of “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go” again with the band. Disc Three is Dylan again using only a bassist, with a few tracks also using organ or piano. Disc Four is made up of a few solo tracks of “Buckets Of Rain”, and the rest again with bassist Tony Brown. Disc Five continues with Dylan using only a bassist for accompaniment with remakes of “Tangled Up In Blue” “Simple Twist Of Fate”, “Idiot Wind”, and a few other songs. Disc Six has the Minneapolis tracks recorded with local musicians that were released on the original album but with a slightly different sound.The packaging is similar to other Dylan box sets. Everything slips into a (8 1/2″ X 9″) hardcover slipcase. There’s two books–one with the discs and track-by-track information, along with period photos. Each disc slips into a pocket in a hard cardboard page in the book which incorporates some cool graphics in the pages for each disc. The other book-a 122 page hardcover book with sewn in pages (“Stories In The Press, Photographs, Writings and Memorabilia”) is full of more ephemera like photos of Dylan in sessions and on stage. A number of pages are taken up with a repro of one of Dyaln’s notebooks of lyrics from these sessions that show him changing lyrics that better suited him. There’s some great repros of test pressing labels, promotional record jackets, artwork, singles record jackets, album charts, a newspaper piece from Ralph J. Gleason (“In Praise Of A Mouth Harpist”), and other great stuff that few people have previously seen.This is one of the better volumes in this fine Bootleg Series, and anyone who finds something of meaning in the original album should add this apparently limited edition set to their shelf of Dylan music. I had this set prior to the official release date so I could post this review on release day.

  2. Emperor Aquaman

    “To me it felt almost too intimate; too close to the bone. Literally blood on every track.””Nobody convinces Bob to do anything Bob doesn’t want to do.””Fierce, passionate, and intense. Dylan is still almost as different as one could imagine from the artist he had been just three months prior in New York.”This is a box set many people (including me) have waited for, for quite some time. This latest trawl through Dylan’s vaults wasn’t released simply to assuage fan’s desires for more music from the “Blood On The Tracks” sessions–but to ensure that copyright control didn’t slip away from Columbia/Sony Records. But the legal reasons are well beside the point. The end results for Bob-o-philes and/or fans of that original album is that we now get to hear the available tracks recorded over those six days in ’74. In one way this set can be heard as a multi-disc extension of the original album’s songs–not just Dylan working through the lyrics and the music to the final takes.Now issued in chronological order, and without the slight echo added to the original album tracks and at the correct pitch for the first time, this music takes us down avenues explored by Dylan as he tries various combinations of musicians and lyrics in search of hearing on tape what he heard in his head. And with the remixed sound (even on the officially released album tracks) these performances have a closeness, an immediacy, a “human-ness” that brings another dimension to these songs. The original album tracks, now remixed, have a slightly different feel to them, while the unheard tracks each bring something worthwhile to fan’s ears. The majority of these tracks are taken from the multi-track master tapes, but there are a few tracks that come from mono 1/4″ rough mixes, which have lower fidelity.And while there’s multiple takes of a number of songs, the seeming repetition doesn’t make for tedious listening–far from it. There’s a certain something here that’s captivating–listening to Dylan as he changes his mind (and a few lyrics) to something ever closer to what he wanted. Picking out high points is pretty useless. Each take here has something to recommend it–these album sessions are that important. There’s a single disc available that picks out a few alternate takes which only hints at this whole process Dylan went through. But diving deep into the music from these sessions (a few tracks have been previously released on the “Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3”, “Biograph”, and “Blood On The Tracks” test pressings) you really begin to understand what was in Dylan’s mind during this period–an album about his personal problems–or an album influenced by Chekov’s short stories–who knows for sure? From solo sessions to duos. trios and full bands, this multi-disc set is the best way to hear all the tracks surrounding one of Dylan’s finest albums.Disc One is Dylan solo–vocal, acoustic guitar, harmonica–with some intimate performances that are quite nice to finally hear together. Disc Two has Dylan playing with the Deliverance band–but the band not giving enough impact to Dylan’s songs–which nonetheless are a good insight into Dylan’s struggles recording these tunes. Also here are several takes of “Idiot Wind” with only a bassist accompanying Dylan which have a power of their own, and many takes of “You’re Gonna Make Me Lonesome When You Go” again with the band. Disc Three is Dylan again using only a bassist, with a few tracks also using organ or piano. Disc Four is made up of a few solo tracks of “Buckets Of Rain”, and the rest again with bassist Tony Brown. Disc Five continues with Dylan using only a bassist for accompaniment with remakes of “Tangled Up In Blue” “Simple Twist Of Fate”, “Idiot Wind”, and a few other songs. Disc Six has the Minneapolis tracks recorded with local musicians that were released on the original album but with a slightly different sound.The packaging is similar to other Dylan box sets. Everything slips into a (8 1/2″ X 9″) hardcover slipcase. There’s two books–one with the discs and track-by-track information, along with period photos. Each disc slips into a pocket in a hard cardboard page in the book which incorporates some cool graphics in the pages for each disc. The other book-a 122 page hardcover book with sewn in pages (“Stories In The Press, Photographs, Writings and Memorabilia”) is full of more ephemera like photos of Dylan in sessions and on stage. A number of pages are taken up with a repro of one of Dyaln’s notebooks of lyrics from these sessions that show him changing lyrics that better suited him. There’s some great repros of test pressing labels, promotional record jackets, artwork, singles record jackets, album charts, a newspaper piece from Ralph J. Gleason (“In Praise Of A Mouth Harpist”), and other great stuff that few people have previously seen.This is one of the better volumes in this fine Bootleg Series, and anyone who finds something of meaning in the original album should add this apparently limited edition set to their shelf of Dylan music. I had this set prior to the official release date so I could post this review on release day.

  3. Frank Scarangella

    Just wanted to add a 1-star review for the printing error and poor customer service so far in not offering replacements for the expensive item. For those willing to pay for physical CDs and a “deluxe” edition, this should’ve been done properly and the record company should take responsibility for fixing the problem. Several discs also have scratches but I haven’t listened all the way through yet to know if it matters. No glue on my discs, fortunately. My item arrived slightly damaged which is in keeping with Amazon’s poor packaging practices and separately Dylan Inc’s inattention to fan service (I had the same problem years ago with the Tell Tale Signs box). I recall receiving other expensive box sets in the past that have had some better packaging that goes around the item but also inside Amazon’s cardboard box.Music of course is amazing so far. I love the New York sessions, and the mixing / sound quality sounds great. The music breathes better than what I’ve heard from the original CD, the 2003 remaster, and the MFSL remaster. I haven’t done close A/B’ing of same tracks yet though.Addendum 11/4/18:So none of the scratches on the discs seem to have impacted the audio. I wanted to add again that the material itself is amazing. I was very surprised at how very little actual filler there is on this set. Almost every take is amazing, to the extent that virtually any combination of recordings of the 10 final songs would’ve made for a historic album if released in 1975. Astonishing consistency in quality (while maintaining the classic Dylan variation in delivery and performance), far beyond what I would’ve expected based on the 18-disc Cutting Edge, the Basement Tapes, various unreleased outtakes from other albums, etc.Again, the sound quality and mixing choices are amazing. I’m particularly thrilled with what they did with the five remaining Minneapolis recordings — the performances sound more epic and timeless. I greatly prefer these mixes to any of the various prior official and unreleased masters I’ve heard over the years. Next thing I’ll do is make my own playlist of all the master takes — this will better supplant any of the other releases of the official album than the equivalent from The Cutting Edge (master takes from that release were sometimes missing too much final polish).Fans online have been discussing mixes missing from the test pressing, some of the details around “Idiot Wind” recordings, overdubs and edits, etc. I think the right thing would have been to include a disc with a copy of the original acetate.

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