Tempest

4 out of 5

$10.89

SKU: B008LZHA3G Category:

Description

Tempest is Bob Dylan’s highly-anticipated 35th studio album and coincides with the 50th anniversary of his 1962 eponymous debut album. Produced by Jack Frost and recorded with the members of Dylan’s touring band and Los Lobos’ David Hidalgo, Tempest has received worldwide critical acclaim and has…

Reviews

  1. A carbon-based life form, inseparable & aloof

    I would dearly love to run away with this man if only for one or two strange nights. And seeing as I have Asperger’s Syndrome, that’s saying a helluva lot. Then again, he’s one who loves his privacy as much as I do. Maybe we can meet up in dreamtime. Bob Dylan’s music has always painted pictures in my mind. I reckon he does so in his own when he writes the songs and that’s the reason he’s able to communicate meaning so well. I love what he’s written, his voice is that of a man who has lived life in sweet, chaotic, serene, secretive and metaphysically interesting ways. He’s also one who draws what he sees in HIS mind’s eye. I hear both Christian and Buddhist. Gnostic? Perfidy! ; )The woman who dissed his rhyming couplets failed to mention the one moment in his astonishingly gorgeous and powerful “Blood on the tracks” when he rhymed “extreme” and “midstream”. Most people were immediately overwhelmed when he WENT OUT OF HIS MIND powerfully in the next verse. I thought: “Now THAT was a save!”I’m still undecided about a favorite song on this album, although “Roll On, John” really was called for and hit me where I live. I’ve heard so many COVERS and TRIBUTES to the man’s *work*, but to the man himself? A dearth, sad to say. Thank you for this song. Just the way he sings the name “John” is like a caress.

  2. Classics Collector

    I would dearly love to run away with this man if only for one or two strange nights. And seeing as I have Asperger’s Syndrome, that’s saying a helluva lot. Then again, he’s one who loves his privacy as much as I do. Maybe we can meet up in dreamtime. Bob Dylan’s music has always painted pictures in my mind. I reckon he does so in his own when he writes the songs and that’s the reason he’s able to communicate meaning so well. I love what he’s written, his voice is that of a man who has lived life in sweet, chaotic, serene, secretive and metaphysically interesting ways. He’s also one who draws what he sees in HIS mind’s eye. I hear both Christian and Buddhist. Gnostic? Perfidy! ; )The woman who dissed his rhyming couplets failed to mention the one moment in his astonishingly gorgeous and powerful “Blood on the tracks” when he rhymed “extreme” and “midstream”. Most people were immediately overwhelmed when he WENT OUT OF HIS MIND powerfully in the next verse. I thought: “Now THAT was a save!”I’m still undecided about a favorite song on this album, although “Roll On, John” really was called for and hit me where I live. I’ve heard so many COVERS and TRIBUTES to the man’s *work*, but to the man himself? A dearth, sad to say. Thank you for this song. Just the way he sings the name “John” is like a caress.

  3. Richard R.

    While it is doubtless that much of Bob Dylan’s 60s & 70s work will stand the test of time, there is good argument that his post 2000 recordings (sans the awkward Christmas album) are his best. Perhaps it’s specious to compare the songwriting talents of his youth with his mature art but Tempest goes a long way in underscoring that he is on an awesome 13 year roll.As Dylan’s 60s work reflected the consummate cockeyed youthful slant on that era, his 21st century musings offer curious commentary from a more world weary wordsmith. For word play, Early Roman Kings is up there with Highway 61, Narrow Way is as blues sharp as Maggie’s Farm, Pay In Blood and Scarlet Town as foreboding as Desolation Row, Soon After Midnight as accesible as It Takes A Lot To Laugh…….The band behind him here is as muscular as any he’s used in the studio and perfectly complements his ragged vocal delivery and the weight of his texts. (Heavy but not without his signature humor.) Tempest is the latest in a line of offerings, from Love & Theft on, where form is married brilliantly to function; band to songs, words to music, vocal delivery to message. (The much heralded last 2 songs, the Titanic tale and the John Lennon tribute, would be best left off the disc in my opinion, but even without them the prior 8 songs make for a solid full cd’s worth.)If this was his last album, doubtful because he is nothing if not prolific, it is a magnificent swan song. Maybe he should quit while he is ahead but that’s not his game, he was never afraid to fail. He inspires to keep reaching til we’re dead. And this record swings, he is still making great rock n’ roll and blues records.

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