The Bootleg Volume 6: Bob Dylan Live 1964 – Concert At Philharmonic Hall

4 out of 5

$15.98

SKU: B0000DG069 Category:

Description

The next installment in the Dylan Bootleg Series is a Halloween night show recorded 10/31/64 at NYC’s Philharmonic Hall and originally intended for release as a live album. Dylan biographer Robert Shelton calls this show “one of his greatest concerts,” and it’s certainly got its share of firsts…

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3 reviews for The Bootleg Volume 6: Bob Dylan Live 1964 – Concert At Philharmonic Hall

4 out of 5
  1. Mike London

    THE BOOTLEG SERIES VOL. 6, a bootleg that has been around for decades, is a Halloween show from the Philharmonic Hall in New York City. One of the most important shows in Dylan’s early career, this show gave quite an overview at the time from Dylan’s ever-growing song book, including new, bizaare songs that would show up within a few months on Dylan’s fifth LP, BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME. While much has been made of the later electric performance of the 1960s, it is here that you can see how good Dylan really was with just a guitar, a harmonica, and the signing girlfriend. Covering such a broad overview, Dylan shows all the budding facets of his art up to this time, from the protest songs (including ones that never made the studio records), the more introspective material, and the radical new direction Dylan was pursuing with the three songs from the unreleased (and unrecorded, for that mater) fifth album, BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME. He proves him a very masterful solo performer. If you like Joan Baez, you greatly enjoy the four songs she performs. If you don’t like Baez, this won’t win you over.This 1964 concert, the first all acoustic performance (barring MTV UNPLUGGED, which also has a band) to enter Bob Dylan’s discography, captures Dylan at a peak period as he was making a transitional move into rock and roll. Historically significant, funny, and overall Dylan, this installment of the Bootleg Series show a new side of early Dylan, and as VoodooLord7 points out, quite a contrast from the 1966 Manchester concert. What is so startling about this concert is how Dylan comes across as giddy, young, and, overall, a Minnesota boy just honoured to be playing at such a distinguished venue. When introducing the then unreleased “It’s Alright Ma, I’m Only Bleeding,” he prefaces the song with the comment that it is very funny. On “I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Met),” he forgets the first verse, asking the audience if they knew it. The rest of the album shows Dylan in this ‘aw, shucks’ mode, but he gives the audience a wide variety of songs to chew on, showing them that even though he’s giddy and young, he’s a songwriter the likes of which they’ve never seen.Compare this document to the cynical, aloof Dylan just a few months later. This was before the 1965 Newport show where Dylan brought out the electric band totally broke with the folk scene in general. (Who’d like to see a Bootleg installment of the Newport show???) The general atmosphere totally changed after the Newport show; afterwards Dylan was cynical, confrontational, cutting edge, and ‘hip.’ He’s not angry. He doesn’t have anything to prove. Dylan just wants to give a good show, and he wants to have a good time. After this, he played rock and roll, the likes of which had never been heard before, and forever changed popular music as we know it. The music went in directions, especially lyrically, that totally broke with all songwriting and pop traditions. VOL 6 captures Dylan just before this, and that’s what makes it so endearing and so historically important. Nowhere on VOL 6 is there an equivalent to that legendary accusation “Judas!” on VOL 4. Dylan’s not at war with the folk community who wanted to make him their own personal musical saviour. Instead, he was following his muse and this audience went with it.What makes BOOTLEG SERIES VOL. 6 so special is it gives us the opportunity to listen to Dylan before he made the permanent transition to rock. We can listen to Dylan play with the audience while giving a first rate performance. Those who were in-tune with Dylan this night, though, would surely know Dylan was moving far and away from the folk movement. Dylan showed an unparalleled depth of writing on ANOTHER SIDE, deep, introspective, and far and away from the protest songwriting that had dominated his second and third album. What really must have blown their minds were the new songs (“Mr. Tambourine Man,” “It’s Alright Ma,” and “Gates of Eden) that Dylan had only previously played a very few times. Filled with wildly surrealistic, symbolist imagery, the words floated into your head and showed Dylan was opening up all sorts of new avenues for music, with a much bigger agenda that just being a protest singer, a la Phil Ochs. Dylan proved himself going deeper and deeper into a surrealistic, unprecedented, and never equaled period of songwriting that would become some of the most important songs in all of rock and roll. For those fortunate enough to be there, this would be one show you couldn’t afford to miss. This was history in the making.In the end, an essential addition to Dylan’s canon, and for those interested in following the progression of the twentieth century’s most important song writer, a must-have purchase. For those who love his all acoustic sound of the early 1960s, this will rival the studio albums themselves. With stunning production, a crisp, clean sound, and such an important snapshot of Dylan’s early career, BOOTLEG SERIES VOL 6 will stay in your CD player for the foreseeable future. Highly recommended for the Dylan afficionado.

  2. Pork Chop

    THE BOOTLEG SERIES VOL. 6, a bootleg that has been around for decades, is a Halloween show from the Philharmonic Hall in New York City. One of the most important shows in Dylan’s early career, this show gave quite an overview at the time from Dylan’s ever-growing song book, including new, bizaare songs that would show up within a few months on Dylan’s fifth LP, BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME. While much has been made of the later electric performance of the 1960s, it is here that you can see how good Dylan really was with just a guitar, a harmonica, and the signing girlfriend. Covering such a broad overview, Dylan shows all the budding facets of his art up to this time, from the protest songs (including ones that never made the studio records), the more introspective material, and the radical new direction Dylan was pursuing with the three songs from the unreleased (and unrecorded, for that mater) fifth album, BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME. He proves him a very masterful solo performer. If you like Joan Baez, you greatly enjoy the four songs she performs. If you don’t like Baez, this won’t win you over.This 1964 concert, the first all acoustic performance (barring MTV UNPLUGGED, which also has a band) to enter Bob Dylan’s discography, captures Dylan at a peak period as he was making a transitional move into rock and roll. Historically significant, funny, and overall Dylan, this installment of the Bootleg Series show a new side of early Dylan, and as VoodooLord7 points out, quite a contrast from the 1966 Manchester concert. What is so startling about this concert is how Dylan comes across as giddy, young, and, overall, a Minnesota boy just honoured to be playing at such a distinguished venue. When introducing the then unreleased “It’s Alright Ma, I’m Only Bleeding,” he prefaces the song with the comment that it is very funny. On “I Don’t Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Met),” he forgets the first verse, asking the audience if they knew it. The rest of the album shows Dylan in this ‘aw, shucks’ mode, but he gives the audience a wide variety of songs to chew on, showing them that even though he’s giddy and young, he’s a songwriter the likes of which they’ve never seen.Compare this document to the cynical, aloof Dylan just a few months later. This was before the 1965 Newport show where Dylan brought out the electric band totally broke with the folk scene in general. (Who’d like to see a Bootleg installment of the Newport show???) The general atmosphere totally changed after the Newport show; afterwards Dylan was cynical, confrontational, cutting edge, and ‘hip.’ He’s not angry. He doesn’t have anything to prove. Dylan just wants to give a good show, and he wants to have a good time. After this, he played rock and roll, the likes of which had never been heard before, and forever changed popular music as we know it. The music went in directions, especially lyrically, that totally broke with all songwriting and pop traditions. VOL 6 captures Dylan just before this, and that’s what makes it so endearing and so historically important. Nowhere on VOL 6 is there an equivalent to that legendary accusation “Judas!” on VOL 4. Dylan’s not at war with the folk community who wanted to make him their own personal musical saviour. Instead, he was following his muse and this audience went with it.What makes BOOTLEG SERIES VOL. 6 so special is it gives us the opportunity to listen to Dylan before he made the permanent transition to rock. We can listen to Dylan play with the audience while giving a first rate performance. Those who were in-tune with Dylan this night, though, would surely know Dylan was moving far and away from the folk movement. Dylan showed an unparalleled depth of writing on ANOTHER SIDE, deep, introspective, and far and away from the protest songwriting that had dominated his second and third album. What really must have blown their minds were the new songs (“Mr. Tambourine Man,” “It’s Alright Ma,” and “Gates of Eden) that Dylan had only previously played a very few times. Filled with wildly surrealistic, symbolist imagery, the words floated into your head and showed Dylan was opening up all sorts of new avenues for music, with a much bigger agenda that just being a protest singer, a la Phil Ochs. Dylan proved himself going deeper and deeper into a surrealistic, unprecedented, and never equaled period of songwriting that would become some of the most important songs in all of rock and roll. For those fortunate enough to be there, this would be one show you couldn’t afford to miss. This was history in the making.In the end, an essential addition to Dylan’s canon, and for those interested in following the progression of the twentieth century’s most important song writer, a must-have purchase. For those who love his all acoustic sound of the early 1960s, this will rival the studio albums themselves. With stunning production, a crisp, clean sound, and such an important snapshot of Dylan’s early career, BOOTLEG SERIES VOL 6 will stay in your CD player for the foreseeable future. Highly recommended for the Dylan afficionado.

  3. Uptown Guitar

    On this double CD, I don’t think there’s anything I haven’t heard before, and better on other releases live, bootleg or studio from Bob Dylan. The applause is new, as it was kept on the recording, compared to other recordings.The only innovation here, is the voice of Joan Baez, which is out of this world, with a style of voice and range that is peculiar and (at least to me) apparently very rare and unique, special. In 1,000 people, she’s that 1 person with this type of singing capability, my guess.Does her style work and augment the stage experience with Bob Dylan ? Yes and no. Yes, in that a companion on stage makes the delivery more credible, more balanced and reality-based. No, in that the Mississipi Delta blues tradition, consists of someone articulating pain, sorrow or thoughts from a deeply personal point of view, that are not compatible with a duo style of delivery, in the medium to long term, although short-term, as a guest on stage for 1 or 2 numbers, is surely welcome by everyone.

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